Archive for Africa

Alcohol or a Corporate Prostitute?

Posted in Africa, Europe, Prostitution with tags , , , , on June 28, 2009 by mariayzk

gab1The prostitution that was once confined exclusively to brothels has now permeated into every sphere of our life. The act; modern day prostitution is broadcasted at the workplace, educational institutes and every other place, where power imbalance has engendered social class distinctions within society. Do sex appeal and bottom power get the job done these days, brain cells notwithstanding?

The answer surrounds us like a haunting reality; a stigma that has been canvassed into a positive veil. It’s common observance to hear of young girls being trafficked from Eastern Europe and South Asian countries to work as sex slaves in brothels led by ravenous Madams. However, the spotlight in this article is on corporate prostitutes and scholarly pimps; prostitution where both genders are at play with equal will.

Sexual bargaining for material success has become a common means of achieving social promotion; at the workplace and in universities for academic advancement. Double Yoke; an African novel, depicts these sexual dynamics inside a Nigerian university. The story revolves around Nko, an undergraduate student who is caught between her desire for academic success to provide for her family and her love for her boyfriend, Ete Kamba. Eventually, she gives in to the deceitful professor. However, the story ends tragically, when Ete refuses to accept her and blames her for not being a virgin and the professor; Ikot abuses his authority to restrain her. This story is a reality for many; yet women continue to use bottom power over brain power to cash in short-lived success.

One might say; ‘who cares? It doesn’t affect me’, but it does affect every member of the society, gender notwithstanding. Women entangled within these sexual games often legitimize their acts as a means to achieving sexual liberation. Their attitudes have led to a breakdown and transformation of the social and moral norms of the society and paved the way towards corrupt administrations and flawed educational institutions. Continue reading

I am Alive – Restoring Family Links

Posted in Children, Disasters with tags , , , , , , , , , on June 27, 2009 by mariayzk

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Call it a clan, call it a network, call it a tribe, call it a family: Whatever you call it, whoever you are, you need one. Jane Howard

You wake up in the morning, get up to brush your teeth and there in the mirror pops up a familiar face. Beneath your exterior exists another you, a part of you that carries a million memories with your loved ones spread across borders. What if one day due to  a  natural disaster or armed conflict you lose all ties with your loved ones? What would you do to reunite with them? In this article; I’ll be highlighting one such case; an Aunt’s search for her lost blood ties, her twin nieces who are fighting their lost identities in a small camp based in Tanzania.

In a day and age when domestic violence has become an open day policy in every other household; it is highly motivating to see people who are still keen on restoring family links. I dedicate this article to all those people who have sacrificed their lives in hopes of sustaining a peaceful family life.

Bound under confidentiality, I will be unable to disclose names here. The case revolves around twin sisters, born in early 1990s in Nyanza Lac, Burundi. Having lost their mother at an early age; the girls were being raised by their mother’s employee who passed away a few years ago, leaving them all alone in a world they had yet to understand. To escape the conflict zone, they fled to seek refuge in a camp based in Tanzania; where the girls are presently living. About a week ago, they were led by camp officials to the Burundi embassy, where they were notified that they will soon be sent back to Burundi.  The girls didn’t take this too well considering they have no family ties in Burundi; it seemed like a whole new world to them. In fear of being deported back to Burundi they managed to escape from the embassy and spent the next few days on the streets. However, they couldn’t get too far and were brought back to the camp. Continue reading